Online Support Can Improve Quality of Life for Cancer Patients

New research finds that an online stress management program can significantly improve an individual’s quality of life and improve care after a cancer diagnosis.

Researchers from the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel in Swtizerlan said a cancer diagnosis always causes psychological distress. If the mental component of the diagnosis is not managed, quality of life may suffer and even more, the negative psychological state may have a negative impact on treatment and disease progression.

Ideally cancer treatment is coupled with psychological support. However, currently only a minority of cancer patients receive professional psychological support, particularly during the difficult time immediately after diagnosis.

In order to reach cancer patients early after diagnosis and offer a low-threshold tool to overcome distress, researchers developed the online stress management program STREAM.

During the eight week online program, patients were provided with information, individual exercises on downloadable audio-files, and specific strategies on managing life with cancer. Patients logged in using a secured personal account. Once a week, they participated in a written exchange with a psychologist via an integrated email platform.

The study, which appears in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, is the first to show that newly diagnosed cancer patients significantly benefit from a web-based intervention and report better quality of life and less distress.

In total, 129 patients from Switzerland, Germany, and Austria were allocated to either an intervention or a control group within 12 weeks of starting their cancer treatment. The control group only received access to the program after an eight-week waiting period, enabling a comparison between the two groups.

People who completed the STREAM program (mostly breast cancer patients) assessed their quality of life as significantly higher than the control group. Also, distress, measured on a scale from zero to 10, was significantly lower in the online group than in the control group after the intervention.

“The results show that web-based self-help with regular email contact with a psychologist has the potential to efficiently support newly diagnosed cancer patients and thereby decisively improves cancer care,” said Professor Viviane Hess, Professor of Medical Oncology and Senior Oncologist in Basel.

Online interventions present new opportunities to support people affected by cancer who previously could not be reached. “Digital natives are reaching the age at which the risk for age-related diseases such as cancer increases. Approaches that integrate the internet into patient care will therefore continue to increase in importance,” said Hess.

Source: University of Basil

Study Finds Kids are Not Overmedicated

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A new study suggests that contrary to popular opinion, psychiatric medications are not overprescribed for American kids. In fact, because of limited access to child psychiatrists, researchers worry more about undertreatment and a failure to explore other means of treatments before medications.

Investigators from Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) compared prescribing rates with prevalence rates for the most common psychiatric disorders in children, and discovered that some of these medications may be underprescribed.

“Over the last several years, there has been widespread public and professional concern over reports that psychiatric medications are being overprescribed to children and adolescents in the United States,” said Ryan Sultan, M.D., a child psychiatrist and researcher at CUIMC who led the study.

“We were interested in better understanding this concern.”

The research findings appear online in the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology.

Investigators used data from a national prescription database of 6.3 million children between the ages of three and 24 years. They, and reviewed the annual prescriptions for three psychiatric drug classes: stimulants, antidepressants, and antipsychotics.

They then compared prescribing patterns with known prevalence rates of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety disorders, and depression between young children (three to five years), older children (six to 12 years), adolescents (13 to 18 years), and young adults (19 to 24 years).

This is the first national study to analyze prescription rates for these three types of psychiatric medications in youth.

Annually, an estimated one in eight U.S. teenagers has a depressive episode, and roughly one in 12 children have symptoms of ADHD. During the year studied, fewer than one in 30 teenagers received a prescription for antidepressants, and only one in 20 got a prescription for stimulants.

“Our results show that, at a population level, prescriptions of stimulants and antidepressant medications for children and adolescents do not appear to be prescribed at rates higher than the known rates for psychiatric conditions they are designed to treat,” said Sultan.

“These findings are inconsistent with the perception that children and adolescents are being overprescribed.”

Overall psychiatric drug prescription patterns in children and adolescents children in the youngest group accounted for the smallest number (0.8 percent) of prescriptions for any psychiatric drug. Adolescents accounted for the highest number (7.7 percent).

The number of prescriptions for stimulants was highest in older children (4.6 percent), with males accounting for more of these prescriptions than females. Antidepressant prescriptions increased with age and was highest for young adults (4.8 percent), particularly for females. Antipsychotic prescriptions peaked during adolescence (1.2 percent) and were prescribed slightly more often for males in this age group.

“The study also showed that, among young people in the United States, the patterns of prescriptions for antidepressants and stimulants are broadly consistent with the typical ages associated with the onsets of common mental disorders, said Mark Olfson, M.D., professor of psychiatry at CUIMC and senior author of the paper.

“However, the situation with antipsychotic medications is less clear cut. Given clinical uncertainty over their appropriate indications, it is unclear whether their annual use rates, which ranged from 0.1 percent in younger children to 1 percent in adolescents, are above or below the rates of the psychiatric disorders they aim to treat.”

“These results provide some reassurance to those who are concerned about the overprescribing of psychiatric medications to children and teenagers,” said Sultan.

“Improving access to child psychiatrists through consultation services and collaborative care models may help address potential undertreatment while also reducing the risk of prescribing medications before other treatments have been tried.”

Source: Columbia University/EurekAlert